Diseases

Learn More About a Disease

Porcine parvovirus infection (PPV)

Porcine parvovirus is caused by a parvovirus from the Parvoviridae family. This non-enveloped DNA virus is very stable, extremely resistant and practically impossible to eliminate from the environment. While several strains of porcine parvovirus seem to exist, variations in virulence are not significant. The virus can affect the embryo or fetus. In general, infection in the embryo or fetus occurs two weeks after the sow’s infection. Once the fetus is infected, others can be contaminated by contiguity, which helps to explain why stillborns are often of different sizes.

Clinical Signs +

Clinical signs often manifest in nulliparous and primiparous sows. In addition to the presence of stillborn piglets of different ages, other signs include a drop in fertility, irregular estrous cycles, and a decrease in litter sizes.

Transmission +

Infection occurs oronasally, whether through contact with infected animals excreting the virus or due to the virus being present in the environment. Venereal transmission is also possible, as well as transplacental transmission.

Diagnosis +

Diagnosis is based on parvovirus being detected by immunofluorescence in stillborns or using an ELISA test.

Treatment +

As parvovirus is resistant in the environment, all attempts at eradication are pointless. Your veterinarian is the best person to talk to for recommendations that are right for your farm.

REFERENCE:

1 Maladies d’élevage des porcs (Hog Farming Diseases), 2nd edition, Guy Pierre Martineau

Prevention +

The main method of disease control is based on the vaccination of gilts, sows and boars using an inactivated virus vaccine.

REFERENCE:

1 Maladies d’élevage des porcs (Hog Farming Diseases), 2nd edition, Guy Pierre Martineau